Born Of Osiris kitaristi kommentoi kiertue-elämää ja siihen liittyviä vaikeuksia

Yhdysvaltalaisen progressiivista metalcorea soittavan Born Of Osiriksen kitaristi Lee McKinney on antanut hiljattain haastattelu Guitarworld.com:lle, jossa hän kommentoi yhtyeen elämää tien päällä ja siihen liittyviä taloudellisia vaikeuksia. Lue lisää nähdäksesi Leen viesti aiheeseen liittyen.

“…It’s sad seeing bands that fall apart on tour. It seems if it wasn’t for their band being a “touring” band, they wouldn’t be in that band together or even friends at all. It takes an extreme toll on you performing constantly, eating like crap and getting awful sleep.

Regardless of whether it’s sleeping in a van or partying too much, a good night’s rest is hard to come by sometimes. You also need to know that for at least a good six months, even up to a year or more of your touring career will result in you coming home broke and tired.

There is so much money that goes into touring. Until you have a solid fan base everywhere you go, it can be near impossible to make a living on the road. Make sure you are financially capable to have zero income for as long as it takes for your band to start bringing in extra cash. That’s what pays you: what’s left in the end!

Let’s break down how a tour begins in the first place. Every touring band has a booking agency. The agency is responsible for setting up contracts and shows with promoters around the world to help bring the concerts to you. The agency works out how much the band’s guarantee is, so that no matter how many kids show up to the show, the band gets paid the same.

This helps safeguard the band and the agency. The promoter makes a budget for your guarantee, and all his expenses for the show. This includes renting a facility, paying security guards, paying the staff, and even feeding the band its catering or giving them their buyouts.

Every show, we are either fed one full meal or given what’s called a buyout. The buyout is personal cash for each member that in most cases covers the cost of one meal. This helps tremendously while on the road.

Aside from that meal, most bands give each member a daily “per diem.” This is cash every member gets at the start of each day. It could be $5, $10, $20, whatever the band budgets in that it can afford.

Between the catering/buyouts and per diem, you are able to eat at least a few meals a day. Sometimes promoters even throw in some beer or snacks, but for every show it’s different…”

Kommentoi julkaisua